Basic Tips For Handling Injured Pet

If your pet is injured, it could be in pain and is also most likely scared and confused. You need to be careful to avoid getting hurt, bitten or scratched. View our Pet First Aid brochure​, with more first aid tips. Never assume that even the gentlest pet will not bite or scratch if injured. Pain and fear can make animals unpredictable or even dangerous. Don’t attempt to hug an injured pet, and always keep your face away from its mouth. Although this may be your first impulse to comfort your pet, it might only scare the animal more or cause them pain. Perform any examination slowly and gently. Stop if your animal becomes more agitated. Call your veterinarian or an emergency veterinary clinic before you move your pet so they can be ready for you when you arrive. If necessary and if your pet is not vomiting, place a muzzle on the pet to reduce the chances you’ll be bitten. Dogs may be muzzled with towels, stockings or gauze rolls. Cats and other small animals may be wrapped in a towel to restrain them, but make sure your pet is not wrapped in the towel too tightly and its nose is uncovered so it can breathe. NEVER muzzle your pet if it is vomiting. If possible, try to stabilize injuries before moving an injured animal by splinting or bandaging them. While transporting your injured pet, keep it confined in a small area to reduce the risk of additional injury. Pet carriers work well, or you can use a box or other container (but make sure your pet has enough air). For larger dogs, you can use a board, toboggan/sled, door, throw rug, blanket or something similar to act as a stretcher. You should always keep your pet’s medical records in a safe, easily accessible place. Bring these with you when you take your dog for emergency treatment. Always remember that any first aid administered to your pet should be followed by immediate veterinary care. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet’s life until it receives veterinary treatment. Original...

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7 Signs Your Dog Is In Pain

Knowing when your dog is feeling pain is important to their health and quality of life. It’s critical to be able to read your dog and know when something isn’t quite right. Dogs can’t speak human after all. It’s also an important skill to know if a dog is in pain when working in the field of veterinary medicine. It can be tricky with some dogs and easier with others to decide whether or not they are feeling painful and knowing exactly where the pain is coming from. Here are 7 symptoms of pain in dogs that can help you better identify what your pet is going through. Limping This symptom is pretty straightforward. Dogs can limp for a variety of reasons, mostly all of them related to pain. As dogs get older, many will experience arthritis. Some other indications that your dog is experiencing pain from arthritis might be refusing to go up the stairs or slow to get up in the mornings. Stiffness is another sign of arthritis pain. Many people will say – “Oh he’s just getting old.” This may be true, but this does not mean that their dog can’t feel pain just because they are old. There are ways to help dogs with arthritis and the signs shouldn’t just be ignored or brushed away. Tummy Troubles I’m sure eveyone knows that an upset stomach can hurt! Knowing if your dog’s tummy is hurting isn’t always the easiest thing to recognize. Excessive salivation is a good indication of nausea. I’m not talking about Fido’s normal amount of drooliness. And of course there is always vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation. These symptoms could mean your dog’s tummy isn’t feeling great. Vocalization Crying out in pain may be a dog’s best way to communicate to people that something hurts. It’s one of the closest things they have to speaking. Whining and whimpering for no apparent reason can be a sign of pain in your dog. Knowing where the pain is coming from can be the hard part in this case. If your dog cries out when a certain area is touched, it is more than likely painful in that area. Stop Dog Pain With Flexpet Temperament & Behavior Just like people, dogs can get grouchy if they aren’t feeling up to par. A dog who is normally very friendly could become aggressive and even try to bite. Especially if they are touched in an area that hurts. Others may seek more attention from their people and seem more needy than usual. Other behavior changes like refusal to go up the stairs, not wanting to lower their head to...

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Pet bounce Vitamin Review

Pet Bounce Vitamin = Healthier Dogs Dogs are the most loyal of all pets. They stick around even when you’re down and they’ll never leave you in your tough times. So, isn’t it only right that you give them all the tender, loving care you can give? Some dog-owners might think that it’s enough to feed them, bathe them, groom them, pet them and play with them. Well, that’s not really the case. Above all else, we want our dogs to stay happy and healthy so that we may enjoy their company and love longer. To help your dog attain a healthier body, you also need to give them some vitamins. But with so many vitamins out there, how do you know which ones to choose? Well, it always helps to read and research any information you can about them, and that’s exactly what we’re here to do. We are here to give you a brief on Pet Bounce Vitamin – a multivitamin that’s good for your dogs. What Is Pet Bounce Vitamin? Pet Bounce is actually a complete multivitamin made for the sole purpose of supporting your dog’s health and overall welfare. It’s not just for dogs though, it’s for both the canine AND feline families. So, if you have cats at home, they can also take Pet Bounce for a healthier body. Aside from containing the essential nutrients your dog needs, it also contains an anti-oxidant called Resveratrol that helps boost your dog’s immune system and vitality. Best of all, it’s flavorful AND chewable! It is something even your kids will appreciate, so your pets will surely do too. Why Does Your Dog Need Vitamins? We’ve been taking about having your dogs take multivitamins like Pet Bounce, but does your dog really need them? The answer is a big YES. Just like humans, dogs also have a complex anatomy that can be affected by external factors such as pollution, bad food intake, bacteria and viruses. They are also prone to sickness. In fact, there are specific illnesses that are common to specific breeds of dog; like how large and giant-breed dogs are the ones more prone to the Wobbler syndrome – which is a type of spinal cord disorder in dogs. When you add Petbounce to your dog’s daily diet, you’re not only adding love but also more years to their life. How Does Petbounce Vitamin Work? Basically, Petbounce was created to give your dogs the complete package when it comes to vitamins and nutrients so that no matter what size or breed your dogs are, they will still get everything they need to live a healthier...

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How to Prevent Cancer in Your Dogs – Vitamin For Your Dog

According to research, 75% of dogs don’t get enough vitamin D in their body. Unlike humans, dogs could not garner vitamin D from exposure to the sun. Dogs solely get their vitamin D from their diet. But, what is Vitamin D and how do dogs benefit from it? Vitamin D aids in the absorption of phosphorus and calcium in the body. Phosphorus assist in the growth and repair of body cells and tissues. Calcium strengthens bones and teeth, conducts nerve impulses, contracts muscles, produces the heartbeat and a factor in clotting blood. Click Here For Vitamin D For Dogs The Epidemic of Low Vitamin D In the past years, dog food contains lesser vitamin D. This will lead to hypocalcemia or low calcium in the body. This will cause brittle bones, bone deformities such as rickets, and even dysfunctions in the immune system. The best indicator of circulating vitamin D in the body is the 25-hydroxyvitaminD (25VitD) or the calcifediol. Calcifediol is produced by the liver to act as the converter of vitamin D3, the type of vitamin D absorbed from the sun or fatty meat, and to its active form, vitamin D. It is determined that dogs should have 100 to 120 ng/mL of 25VitD in their body. A Link between Vitamin D and Cancer The link between vitamin D and cancer is still under the microscope. According to a research conducted by Sharp et.al. on “The effects of diet on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25VitD) concentrations in dogs”, it was speculated that dogs who have a lower amount of 25VitD in their body are more prone to having cancer. However, 25VitD is just the precursor of vitamin D. In a study made in 2004, results accounted that 25VitD in dogs with lymphoma, hyperparathyroidism, and kidney disease were lower than those of healthy dogs. Furthermore, the active form of Vitamin D wasn’t different between these sick dogs and healthy dogs. What we can conclude from these researches is that diseases can reduce the dog’s ability to formulate 25VitD and not vitamin D. Also, we conclude that a low 25VitD is present in cancer. The Link to Cancer and Disease As shown in the aforementioned research, the 25VitD in dogs with lymphoma and other diseases were lower than those of healthy dogs, while the active form of Vitamin D wasn’t different between the sick and the healthy dogs. It could be said that the link between cancer and other diseases is the lowered amount of 25VitD circulating in the body. Click Here For Vitamin D For Dogs Vitamins for Dogs Because it is difficult to test the presence of vitamin...

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Sand Flea Bites – Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

More often than not, enjoying the beach also means dealing with sand fleas and the unpleasant skin conditions they cause. But what are they exactly? Should you be concerned if you get bitten by them? Here is a quick guide to help you get through such uncomfortable situations. What Are Sand Fleas and Where Do They Come From? Sand fleas go by different names: pigue, chigoe flea, pico, jigger, Pulex penetrans, Sarcopsylla penetrans, etc. These are wingless, shrimp-looking creatures with specialized mouthparts which help them suck blood. Because of their features and appearance, sand fleas are commonly mistaken as crustaceans. The body of sand fleas usually has 7 segments and its length is only about 1 mm, making them difficult to see with the naked eye. They have long legs that help them in jumping and swimming. They aren’t good jumpers, though: they can only cover 20-40 cm. in a single jump. As such, sand fleas don’t travel long distances; they are found within a narrow radius near bodies of water such as beaches, lake beds, creeks, and pools. Beaches, however, are their main dwelling place so regular beach-goers are the most common victims. Sand Flea Bites A regular sand flea bite is similar to a common mosquito bite: the flea sucks blood and leaves for another host, leaving an itchy, and sometimes painful, swollen mark. The fleas inject the host with saliva to make the former’s blood thinner and thus easier to suck. That saliva is what causes skin irritation. This may also result in allergic reactions. Breeding Sand Flea Bites This type of sand flea bites is worse than the regular one. Breeding female sand fleas burrow under the skin and hide there for about two weeks, waiting for their eggs to hatch. The affected body parts swell and dark spots appear at the center of the swollen area/s. If you’re showing this symptom, seek treatment right away. Sand Flea Bites Symptoms Both types of sand flea bites cause symptoms such as pain, itching, discomfort, and unpleasantness. If you are allergic to flea bites, you may experience more severe reactions accompanied by dizziness, chest pain, difficulty in breathing, nausea, and swelling of lips and tongue. When breeding sand fleas burrow under your skin, you may experience further symptoms like fever and infection, which may develop into an inflammatory skin disease called tungiasis. This condition must be treated immediately to avoid secondary infections. How to Get Rid of Sand Fleas Sand fleas do not compare to the regular fleas we know – they are far worse. When threatened, they resist and bite harder. They could even attach themselves...

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Flea Bites on Humans

What are fleas? Fleas are very tiny reddish-brown parasites that are equipped with incredible jumping ability. These parasites are hard to see due to their small size and are found not only on pets but humans as well, feeding on their blood in order to survive. Fleas carry different types of bacteria and diseases; thus, just one tiny bite from them can commonly cause the victim’s body to experience allergic reactions and rashes. What do flea bites look like on humans? Although often found on pets, fleas do not limit themselves to attaching and feeding themselves from your pet. In fact, if you have a pet with fleas, even you are exposed to the risk of being infected with them. This may not be that common of a case compared to pets, but it definitely happens. Flea bites on humans can be identified through the appearance of red bumps, which are commonly seen in clusters, on the skin. Due to the small size of these bites, they usually remain unnoticed unless one starts itching. Flea bites vs. bed bug bites on humans Bed bugs and fleas are not that quite easy to identify since they posses a lot of similarities with one another. For example, bed bugs, just like fleas, are also tiny nocturnal parasites that are reddish-brown in color. However, the difference between them is that bed bugs are larger in size compared to fleas and they do not posses incredible jumping ability. Just like with their appearance, you may also find it confusing to differentiate between flea bites and bed bug bites on humans. Here is how you will be able to identify flea bites from bed bug bites: Flea bites are small clusters of dots resembling mosquito bites, except that they have a dark red center that come from the single bite of the flea when it was sucking blood. Flea bites become swollen in less than an hour and immediately start to itch. In about one or two days, those bites can turn into an open sore or a blister. Bed bug bites, on the other hand, often appear in a straight line that usually consists of three to four bites. These bites are flat red welts that seem to appear raised because of the anesthesia and anticoagulants found in the parasite’s saliva. Unlike flea bites, bed bug bites mostly take a week to show up and gradually start to itch more and more as the anesthesia found in their saliva wears off. Flea bite symptoms There are several symptoms of flea bites. One of the flea bite symptoms is a sore and painful feeling...

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